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  • Series ‘A’       

    Series ‘A’  ♦ Course 1    

1. Sound, Music, and the Environment                          
What do different cultures mean by music? This program explores the definition of music from the sine wave to poetic metaphor, and the impact of the cultural environment on musics as different as Bosnian  ganga and becarac singing; Tuvan throat singing; Irish, West African, Trinidadian, and Japanese
musics; and Western chamber music, jazz, and rock.

 Series ‘A’  ♦  Course 1 – ENTIRE SET:  Lessons 1 – 11

$100.00 Full-Set of 11 Lessons:        Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson:      Buy Now Button with Credit Cards  

 

   Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 2

 2. The Transformative Power of Music 
Music can inspire religious devotion, prepare individuals for war, motivate work, enrich play, and stimulate the passions. The musical healing ceremonies of the Kung people in Namibia and Botswana, Epirote music in traditional Greek weddings, and modern rock, gospel, and folk musics all reveal music’s power to transform lives.

 Series ‘A’  ♦  Course 2 – ENTIRE SET:  Lessons 1 – 12  

♦  $100.00 Entire Set of 12 Lessons:   Buy Now Button with Credit Cards 

♦ $10.00 Per Lesson:  Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

 

     

Series ‘A’ Course 3 

3. Music and Memory  

As a dynamic link to the past, music allows us to recall and revive our different cultural heritages through the performances we participate in now. West African griots, the Walbiri people of Australia, folksingers of Ireland and Appalachia, and modern practitioners of early music show us how our musical pasts live again today.

Series ‘A’  ♦ Course 3:  Lessons 1 – 10 

♦  $100.00 ENTIRE SET of 10 Lessons:  Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson:  Buy Now Button with Credit Cards 

 

Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 4

4. Transmission: Learning Music 

How we learn musical traditions and how we maintain, modify, notate, teach, and perform them for a new, younger audience are exemplified here in Indian classical music, African village drumming, and modern jazz and gospel.

Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 4:  Lessons 1-14

♦  $100.00 ENTIRE SET of 14  Lessons: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards  

            Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 5

5. Rhythm

Marking time and moving through our bodies, rhythm has a special relationship to both musical form and worldwide dance traditions. How rhythm structures music is examined through the American marching band, North Indian tala, Japanese shakuhachi tradition, West African drumming, and Afro-Cuban dance music.

Series ‘A’  ♦  Course 5: Lessons 1 – 14 

$100.00 ENTIRE SET of 14 Lessons: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards  

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson:  Buy Now Button with Credit Cards    

Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 6

6. Melody 
Melody — the part of music we most often remember — is examined here both scientifically and poetically, from a strict sequence of pitches to a group of notes “in love with each other.” We see and hear melodies shaped, elaborated, and developed within Western classical music, the Arabic maqam tradition, Irish dance music and sean-nós singing, and Indian raga.  

Series ‘A’ ♦  Course 6: Lessons 1 – 12  

$100.00 ENTIRE SET of 12  Lessons: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards   

  

Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 7

7. Timbre: The Color of Music 
The tone color of music — or “timbre,” as we call it in the Western tradition — is influenced by both technical and aesthetic factors. This program examines the creation and effects of timbre in jazz and Indian, West African, Irish, Bosnian, Indonesian gamelan, and Japanese musics.

Series ‘A’  ♦  Course 7:  Lessons 1 – 12  

$100.00 ENTIRE SET of 12 Lessons: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 8

8. Texture 
The way different voices and instruments work together to produce the overall sound gives music its texture. This program examines texture in Japanese shakuhachi, Trinidadian steel band, Bosnian ganga, West African percussion, and modern Australian choral music.

Series ‘A’  ♦  Course 8:  Lessons 1 – 14

♦  $100.00 ENTIRE Set of 14 Lessons: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 9

9. Harmony 
When two or more notes sound together, harmony occurs. This interaction of pitches, understood in vastly different ways around the world, is analyzed here in jazz, chamber music, Bosnian ganga singing, early music plainchants, and barbershop quartets.

Series ‘A’  ♦  Course 9:  Lessons 1 – 12 

♦  $100.00 Full-Set of 12 Lessons: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards  

        

Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 10

10. Form: The Shape of Music 
Form — the way music is organized and structured from beginning to end — guides composers, performers, and listeners in all musics. Here, the traditional Western sonata, the blueprints behind improvisational jazz, the narrative structure of traditional Japanese music, call-and-response forms in West African music and American gospel, and Irish fiddle tunes exemplify worldwide variations in musical form.

Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 10:  Lessons 1 – 10 

$100.00 ENTIRE SET of 10 Lessons: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson:  Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

 

Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 11

11. Composers and Improvisers 
How are a composer and an improvisor alike? How are they different? The marriage between fixed elements and new variation is examined in American rock, Indian raga, classical and contemporary Western music, jazz, and Arabic classical music.

Series ‘A’ ♦ Course 11:  Lessons 1 – 11 

♦  $100.00 ENTIRE SET of 11 Lessons: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards  

   Series ‘A’   ♦  Course 12

12. Music and Technology 
New instrument types and new electronic media for distribution are obvious results of technology, but so were the first bone flute and the first stretched catgut. How technology affects music is examined here in a case study of the flute, and in an examination of developing recording and composing technologies where the roles of composer, musician, arranger, and conductor begin to fuse.

Series ‘A’  ♦  Course 12:  Lessons 1 – 12 

♦  $100.00 ENTIRE SET of 12 Lessons: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards

♦  $10.00 Per Lesson: Buy Now Button with Credit Cards 

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Ella: A Glimpse at an Opera Legend’s Humor and Classic Exploits!

countess gratitude

Ella Lee_1

The late International Operatic Soprano Ella Lee recently passed away.  Referred to as “Miss Ella” by her Voice students, she was also my first teacher of all-things-related-    to-opera.

A role model for many, Ella Lee was an up-close-and-personal opera-career role   model, who’s work and legacy (like singing the role of Verdi’s Aida 500-times, to name a few), will continue to inspire hope and creativity for years to come.   During the time in which I studied with her “Miss Ella” was very much like a spiritual mother to me. 

A friend relayed to me the sad news of her passing, less than one week ago.  While pondering exactly how tribute might be paid to this person of significance, an Article came across my radar, reminding me of the things that were most beloved about Ella.

She was a kind person;  she was generous;  she was funny; she was…

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Ella: A Glimpse at an Opera Legend’s Humor and Classic Exploits!

Ella Lee_1

The late International Operatic Soprano Ella Lee recently passed away.  Referred to as “Miss Ella” by her Voice students, she was also my first teacher of all-things-related-    to-opera.

A role model for many, Ella Lee was an up-close-and-personal opera-career role   model, who’s work and legacy (like singing the role of Verdi’s Aida 500-times, to name a few), will continue to inspire hope and creativity for years to come.   During the time in which I studied with her “Miss Ella” was very much like a spiritual mother to me. 

A friend relayed to me the sad news of her passing, less than one week ago.  While pondering exactly how tribute might be paid to this person of significance, an Article came across my radar, reminding me of the things that were most beloved about Ella.

She was a kind person;  she was generous;  she was funny; she was even loving.  She never berated or belittled her students.  Even on those days when perhaps the student’s ‘technique’ was not ‘up to par,’ Ella would somehow find a way to humorously chime-in words to the effect of:  “Well, baby, it’s okay.  Everyone is really not meant to be a career singer:  some people are just meant to do this for fun!”

Perhaps the student left the Lesson aware that his or her journey might not land him or her in New York City, at the ‘Artists Entrance’ of The Metropolitan Opera House.  Still, the student felt good about whatever progress he or she was making.  And, he or she actually experienced an enjoyable time during his or her lesson, as opposed to feeling like a nervous breakdown was pending, because so much ‘pressure’ and so many ‘demands’ were being placed on him or her by the teacher.   The students departed from their lessons feeling supported and embraced, regardless of whether or not their abilities were at levels deeming them ‘worthy’ of entering all, of one of the numerous classical competitions in existence. 

Therefore, for this student — in those moments?  Can you imagine how he or she felt about his or her singing, and his or her lessons with Miss Ella?  Can you imagine how those moments might have meant all the world to the student?!

For me, Ella, best relayed enjoyable aspects of being an Opera Star that were not necessarily related to how a singer could ‘perfect’ his or her vocal technique.  It was ever-so-exciting when she talked about the juicy details of her exploits, and those of others. 

Ella enjoyed her life as an opera singer:  this was apparent in the way she talked about opera, singing, her career and the people with whom she worked.  

Further, she was not arrogant regarding her accomplish-ments;  nor did she exert ideas of ‘superiority’ over others.  She was a happy person: a fun person.  She encouraged her students to make the best of their own unique voices, and she inspired each one of us to derive the most pleasure possible from the music we sung.   “Otherwise, what’s the point?’’ was her question.

Ella was an “experience” and when a person was “experiencing Miss Ella” that person became privy to privileged, first-handed accounts of a 30-year-career-Diva who performed Principal roles on opera stages all across Europe and the USA during the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. 

Her verbal reenactments of her exploits allowed for brief, direct glimpses into a fascinating world, such that the stories were often the highlight of the student’s Voice Lessons.  This was certainly the case for me.  It was the thing that many of her students most looked forward to while training:  her warmth, her wit, her charm, and her stories!

Two and a half years ago, when I last saw Miss Ella she provide me with a Letter of Recommendation.  Since that time we had only chatted over the phone.

Ella Lee_3

I have not yet completely determined how I desire to pay tribute to this woman, who influenced the direction of my life in a profound and positive way.   Miss Ella will be sorely missed, and yet, the impact she made was significant. 

In the meantime, as stated earlier, I came across a writing, which sparked fond thoughts about Ella.  Below is a snippet from this  Los Angeles Times Article, which to me, seems to embody a tone of intrigue.  Therefore, it felt too delicious to not share. 

The writer of the Article is the late beloved Los Angeles Times Music Writer, Daniel Cariaga

Ironically, until the time of his death in 2006, this same beloved music critic, Cariaga was married to my SECOND Opera Voice Teacher — International Wagnarian Mezzo Soprano Marvellee Cariaga.  

Cariaga-Marvellee-01

Both Ella and Marvellee were strong forces-with-whom-to-be-reckoned during their careers.  However, almost in complete opposition to Marvellee’s approach, Ella, who was a classic-Diva in every regard — she could never understand  how any woman … could have ONLY HAD ONE husband  during her lifetime!   And, her accounts involving the husband referenced in this Article-blub, (below), they were particularly humorous. 

Spoken with affection, Ella’s references to ‘the most recent ex-husband’ made one fact crystal clear to the listener:  It was the man’s undeniable good looks, coupled by his strong performance abilities on, as well as off stage —these were the qualities that most inspired their union!

And while “it was fun while it lasted,” according to Ella, the unfortunate lack of keen business sense that co-existed in conjunction with the hot ‘n heavy chemistry between the two opera singers?  This proved to be a recipe for an overall disastrous marital partnership.  The marriage was thereby doomed from the start! 

Per the excerpt from Cariaga’s Los Angeles Times  Article:

“. . . American soprano Ella Lee and her husband, tenor Arturo Romani, have returned from engagements at the Royal Cultural Center in Amman, Jordan, and at the American University in Beirut, Lebanon, where they sang bel-canto  duets, music by Verdi and Mascagni and a duet composed for them by Abdul Hamid.”   [1] CARIAGA, Daniel, LA Times Music Writer, “Music and Dance News:  Morris and Hogwood Collaborate on Gluck’s ‘Orfeo.’ http://articles.latimes.com/1995-02-12/entertainment/ca-30934_1_mark-morris (February 12, 1995). 

Here’s Miss Ella in an performance with Opera Pasadena.

opera-singers (2014_01_13 18_58_29 UTC)

How to Practice the Art of Gratitude

latónya rosetta 7 (2) Recently, I telephoned an associate with whom I had not communicated for a while. Our interactions had been ‘strained’ for several years, prior to the last time I saw him. Therefore, I latonyarosetta as countess gratitude001 (396x500)was nervous about initiating this latest re-connection.

My motivations were light-hearted and pure however, and so I proceeded, trusting that ‘somehow’ the sentiments would be received in the spirit of good-will, as they were intended.

This person is highly regarded by many — a somewhat high profile individual:  a ‘celebrity’ of sorts.  If I were to mention his name, many people would know him, as well as some of his contributions in the world.

A couple years ago, during my ’emotionally-traumatic transition’ from Blackberry to iPhone, I lost his cell phone number. Therefore, I could not send him the standard ‘text message,’ which, because of the ‘fluctuating levels of affinity’ that had intensified between the two of us over the years, this ‘texting’ seemed to be the closest act of intimacy each of us  knew, ‘intuitively,’ either one could handle coming from the other.  Again still:  I might have been ‘projecting’ my fears onto him with this mode of thinking, I will confess.

Recently, I was pondering ideas of how ‘compassion,’ ‘tolerance,’ ‘patience,’ and ‘temperance’ each transmit (and transmute) subtle, yet profound signals to persons who are in receipt of these communications. Many of us are inclined to ‘fight and defend ourselves’ against attacks aimed in our direction.

This is a natural tendency, and justifiable, since no person deserves being abused by another.

Still, if the truth be told, most attacks aimed at us ARE NOT REALLY MEANT FOR US.  In reality, most people’s ‘lashing out’ — expressing their anger or hurt — is a ‘delayed reaction’ to an offense that transpired LONG AGO.

Perhaps, we have also spoken a recent ‘prayer of surrender,’ requesting that  clarity  affect a positive change in our lives,’ such that, seemingly ‘coincidentally’ — WE just happen to be  ‘fortunate enough’  to come along  right around the time  that this other person is  ‘due’ to be ‘taught  his or her significant-life lesson’.  This happens all “coincidentally,” mind you.

We trigger something within THIS OTHER divine soul:  a conscious or unconscious memory of a past event that left him or her feeling deeply hurt or devastated.   Because  the pain was never consoled nor mended, the individual seizes, then relishes in the opportunity to ‘reconcile  every single-solitary-ounce of hurt and despair  he or she HAS EVER EXPERIENCED’ — all at the exact moment when you or I, innocently stroll along and request from him or her: “the time of day.”

But, here is where the exchange gets good:  here is where OUR LESSON comes into play.  We live in a Universe consisting of natural laws — Laws of Nature — containing concepts referenced in phrases such as:  “You reap what you sow,” “Actions speak louder than words,” and “What goes around, comes around,” to name a few.

Therefore, when it  seems like  we are unjustifiably (or even ‘justifiably) attacked, our ‘growth’ and the ability to ‘over-come the odds,’ and thereby ‘cease’  experiences such traumatic exchanges?  Our ability to partake of what is commonly referred to as a spiritual bypass?

It occurs in the brief millisecond of the millisecond when we opt to either ‘return the favor’ for the hateful action that was directed our way,’ OR, we stay awake:  we do not  check out, space out, go unconscious, nor forget what we know,  but rather, we recognize that one hateful glance, stare or remark results is a responsive ‘venomous reaction,’ to the degree that the waves of negativity recur in successive motions — ultimately being ‘coined’ “never-ending, viscous cycles,” also known as hell on earth.

Practicing ‘restraint,’ and thereby exhibiting ‘kindness towards another’ is what is commonly referred to as ‘taking the high road.’ The ‘loving response,’ often including ‘no response,’ requires a greater degree of  balance and strength  than does the:  “I’mma return the favor” reaction.

The person who exercises his or her ability to ‘not strike back when stricken’  is the person who ‘partakes of the kingdom, here on earth.’   Over time, this mode of operation results in the continual outpouring of more grace, more peace, and more love as this person’s life experiences.

As I write this Article, I recognize that I write these words as a reminder to myself, because during the course of my life, I have often forgotten these truths that I know.  I then also recall the reasons why the name ‘Countess Gratitude’  was assigned to this evolving, opera-singing, theatrical persona:   I KNEW that my consistent, daily-life practices  DID NOT  include enough ‘gratitude’ nor ‘graciousness’:  I’d just assume curse you out, rather than allow you to bat another crooked eye-lash in my direction.  “You will not hurt me” was my silent, inner mantra, and I MEANT it.

Therefore, I wanted to ‘remind myself of these truths that I know,’ and thus decided that this performance character’s name was ONE WAY to create a reminder for myself, as well as possibly others, too, if they chose to engage, with interest.

And so, the another day, I made this phone call to an associate — someone from whom I have been more or less ‘estranged-in-spirit-and-inter-connectivity’  for a while.   I phoned him because  a sudden-strong desire within  compelled me to stop what  I was doing, and take some  time to ‘acknowledge him’  for the important role he has played in my life’s evolution.

I really did not expect to hear back from him:  still, the urge to send the communication propelled me forward, into the activity of placing the phone call to his Office, where I was instructed to leave a message in the Voice Mailbox of his Assistant.

To my surprise, the ‘Assistant,’ turned out to be someone whom I also know, and whom I love very much!  I was PLEASED to discover that she was interacting with him, regularly. This person is SUCH A SWEET energetic presence, so much so that for some reason, it gave me joy to know that my associate was being cared for by someone who exhibits such consistent kindness and generosity of spirit.

Today, the Assistant phoned, and because I was not available to pick up, she also left a Voice mail Message in my Inbox.

When I listened to the Mailbox message, however, I literally stopped in my tracks:  I’d convinced myself  that most of the persons from this particular ‘long-time circle of friends’ could care less whether I lived or died.   I was in the process of permanently shutting down certain Accounts to which they are all connected, so that I would no longer need the constant reminder regarding the ‘disconnect’.

And so now, here entering stage left is this dear, sweet, kind Angel — whom I can only assume God sent to me in that precise and perfect moment.  She expressed sentiments of how ‘grateful’ she was to hear my expressions of appreciation on the Voice message that I’d left.  She further expounded to briefly reminisce, referencing our first meeting — on stage together, singing — years ago — emphasizing how highly she admired and regarded me then, and how she still feels the same way, today.

I nearly dropped the phone.  Had I not been in shock, I would have burst into tears, because I was SO touched.

The beauty of these realizations are thus:   We are all cut from the same cloth, which comes from the Divine.  However, each of us is a unique expression of The One.  We must embrace ourselves, and also acknowledge others during the course of their journey!

It occurred to me that ‘acknowledging the people and things’ that positively affect our lives (also known as expressing ‘gratitude’), it is a necessary aspect of being ‘interconnected.’

In general, I feel most comfy with ‘distance’ between myself and others (like me looking out at the audience from on stage).   Being ‘connected’ to people is something that I can ‘pull off’ once I’ve determined that I am among ‘friends’ and ‘like minds.’   Otherwise, it transpires, sporadically, and only during brief moments when  I  INTENTIONALLY  ‘focus really, really hard.’ 

But today, I received a reminder that ‘whatever I extend outwards to others, it comes back to me:’  good, bad or ugly.   Further, the gracious sentiment, or the affectionate word is frequently not returned by the person to whom the ‘acknowledgement’ was given to from you, but rather, the return gesture to you comes from someone else.   It’s funny how life works in this way.  Still, you ‘get back’ what you ‘put out,’ without restrictions on from where or how the gift is returned to us.

Hearing those compassionate words of recognition from my friend, today, actually INSPIRED ME to do more!  It felt good.  She told me that my message would be passed on to our mutual associate, which is fine by me.  Either way, because of the experience, I am encouraged to act with a little more kindness today; and to practice a bit more patience and temperance tomorrow and the next day; and to exhibit more acknowledgments and love towards both myself, and to others, in the proceeding moments.

For those who ask:  “Where’s the gratitude?  Where’s the love?”

My response is thus:   “It’s right here:  peeking out it’s beautiful head, and expressing itself through me, (and also, hopefully, through you?) to the degree that I surrender to it, allowing myself to be used.”

Equally important are constant reminders that the purpose of the practice is not  to ‘beat up on myself’  during those moments when I fall short of the ultimate mark, but rather: to ‘get back up from the fall, and resume the journey’.

With this in mind, I am inspired to continue along the path of allowing for Goodness, Compassion, Patience and Temperance to be out-pictured in my day-to-day affairs.

Today, I am learning the art of gratitude.  Today, I am grateful.

maze_of_beauty

Debussy, Symbolism and Your Part in Corporate Giving

French Composer Claude Debussy (1862-1918) is noted as the first significant composer of the 20th century.  His harmonic innovations had a profound influence on generations of composers, and in his works for piano and for orchestra he created new genres and revealed a range of timbre and color which indicated a highly original music aesthetic.
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To skip this Article and learn more how to immediately stake your claim as a ‘sponsor and patron of the arts’ without using much of your own resources, click here.

Debussy was heavily influenced by the late nineteenth-century French, Russian and Belgian poetry and art Movement known as Symbolism.   In literature, the Symbolism style had its beginnings with the publication The Flowers of Evil (1857) by Charles Baudelaire. Baudelaire was greatly influenced by the writings of Edgar Allan Poe.   The look, feel or beauty aesthetic of Symbolism was further developed by poets Stephane Mallarme and Paul Verlaine during the 1860s and ’70s.  Distinct from, but related to, the style of literature, symbolism of art is also related to the gothic (combining fiction and horror) component of Romanticism.

Romanticism is described as a partial revolt against the aristocratic social and political norms of the previous Era’s Age of Enlightenment, and a reaction against the scientific explanation and rationalization surrounding man’s existence and nature, which ushered in the Industrial Revolution — the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to 1820 or 1840. This transition included going from hand production methods to machines, new chemical manufacturing and iron production processes, improved efficiency of water power,  of, the increasing use of steam power and the development of machine tools.  It also included the change from wood and other bio-fuels to coal. It began in Great Britain and within a few decades had spread to Western Europe and the United States. .

Romanticism favored intuition and emotion over Enlightenment rationalism.   It was embodied most strongly in the visual arts, music, and literature, but had a major impact on historiography, education and the natural sciences.

You can Benefit When you Become A Part of Debussy’s Legacy

Like famous and unknown music makers today, you, too, can benefit by becoming a part of the rich contribution to the world that Debussy represents.

To learn if you qualify for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to stake your claim as the ‘sponsor of an international performance Artist’ using the financial donations of the corporation for which you work click here; complete the Form below; and/or call (424) 281-7858.

Music:  Tone Poem

Meanwhile, a moment in the life of a sexually-charged fawn is exemplified in “Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune” (Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun), a symphonic poem for orchestra by Claude Debussy.   It was first performed in Paris on December 22, 1894, conducted by Gustave Doret; the composition was inspired by the poem “L’après-midi d’un faune” by Stéphane Mallarmé, and later formed the basis for the ballet “Afternoon of a Faun,” choreographed by Vaslav Nijinsky.

It appears that Mallarmé initially, himself, was unhappy with his poem being used as the basis for Debussy’s work:  “He believed that his own music was sufficient, and that even with the best intentions in the world, it was a veritable crime as far as poetry was concerned to juxtapose poetry and music, even if it were the finest music there is.”

Mallarmé eventually came around, however, later writing in a short letter to Debussy that read: “I have just come out of the concert, deeply moved. The marvel! Your illustration of the Afternoon of a Faun, which presents a dissonance with my text only by going  much further, really, into nostalgia and into light, with finesse, with sensuality, with richness. I press your hand admiringly, Debussy. Yours, Mallarmé.”

Remember, click here to learn if you qualify for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to stake your claim as the ‘sponsor of an international performance Artist’ using the financial donations of the corporation for which you work; complete the Form below; and/or call (424) 281-7858.

How to Make Music, Magic, Love & Master Your Money!

Many people employed by corporations are benefiting immensely when they qualify to have their employer donate sponsorship dollars to a music artist of their choosing.  A meager contribution is all it takes, and the process of taking advantage of this great historical legacy, while helping a performance Artist possibly receive sponsorship is simple and easy.   Yes, those who pride themselves in dazzling and creating life-sustaining and magical effects in the lives of others are learning how to exercise personal power to positively affect the destiny of others.  Further, they are extending very little of their own personal monetary output,yet, they are being informed in the ways of how to utilize personal leverage in support of performing Artists.  Numerous perks result, including the feelings of enormous pride when their names are listed as ‘sponsor’ in support of international performance Artists.
To skip the rest of this Article, and receive more information, go to:  http://doublethedonation.com/singer4life.

2012-02-25 Countess Gratitude 1 001

As a patron of music, regardless of whether your love abides in the tunes or smooth moves of your favorite Pop stars, the vocal power of our own Countess Gratitude, or the magic and genius of Beethoven, the possibility of being a part of a rich musical heritage is right here, at your fingertips.

  Click here to bypass the rest of this Article and learn more!

You see, the legacy of Beethoven is such:   the renowned, 19th century composer Ludwig van Beethoven went deaf during his lifetime, as you know.  Yes, this master of music, Beethoven — he actually lost his hearing.  From the time of his late 20s, until his death at the age of 57, he suffered from a rare disorder, in the form of an inner ear lesion that grew progressively worse through the years, and finally resulted in the complete loss of hearing prior to his final composition.

However, Beethoven possessed the ability to hear music in his mind, and to know what was true in his heart.  His physical limitations did not stop him, in the least. He kept on writing and composing music, and his contributions have had enormous effects upon the music that we hear today, including the music of Justin Timberlake, Beyonce, and many others!

  12 editOne major influence was Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in D-minor, which centers around the infamous “Ode to Joy,” by German poet Friedrich Schiller.   The melody is credited as a German bar drinking tune, which Beethoven  adopted and used to symbolize the common man.  And, by the time this final symphony debuted in Vienna in 1824, the 54- year old Beethoven literally could not hear the music, or the thunderous audience applause that ensued for him afterwards.

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Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 marked one of the most significant landmarks in the history of Western music. Its structural significance, in terms or harmony, tonality, as well as orchestration was unlike anything that had ever been seen or heard, at that time.

Furthermore, this symphony was the first EVER written with voices added to the orchestra! This was a COMPLETELY NEW CONCEPT, which Beethoven decided upon because he heard, in his head, a plethora of harmonics in the music. Since he knew that certain harmonics can only be achieved by way of the voice, it made sense to him that voices should be added to the symphony, even though it had never been done before.

Ludwig_Van_Beethoven_4th_Dimensional

Like many music-makers today, however, Beethoven was a master at setting new trends.  ”Pushing the envelope,” or rather “exploring his creative instincts” to fulfill on his maximum potential was part of his make-up:  this is just how the guy was ‘wired.’

You can Benefit When you Become A Part of Beethoven’s Legacy

Like famous and unknown music makers today, you, too, can benefit by becoming a part of the rich contribution to the world that Beethoven represents.  It is not necessary that you possess great musical talent or ability:  you are, no doubt, gifted in other areas.  Still, there is a way that you can still play a part, and also gain personal advantages in the process.  Click here to learn more.

If you are employed by a corporation, you could benefit immensely if you qualify to have the corporation donate sponsorship dollars to a music artist of your choosing.  A mere contribution of $10 or less, is all it takes, and the process of taking advantage of this great historical opportunity, while helping a performance Artist possibly receive sponsorship is simple and easy.
For someone who takes pride in having power and influence in the life of others, listing your name as ‘sponsor’ of an international performance Artist, with little monetary output on your own part, could prove to be of a great benefit.   Click here for more information, and or complete the form below.

Monster Composition

Needless to say,  Beethoven’s “monster-composition,” Symphony No. 9 in D-minor,  transformed and advanced music into what it is today!  It set the bar ‘high,’ and established a standard of excellence towards which one could strive. It established the tone and direction of music for the next generation of composers. This Symphony had a tremendous overall effect on the ways in which we hear, create and experience music, today.

Here are various versions of the “Ode to Joy” theme, followed by the one and only Symphony No. 9 in D-minor by Ludwig van Beethoven.

To learn if you qualify to stake your claim as the ‘sponsor of an international performance Artist,’ using the financial donations of the corporation for which you work, click here to receive more information, or complete the Form below.   Enjoy the music!

The Muppets perform the “Ode to Joy” theme

Contemporary Christian version of the “Ode to Joy” theme (“Joyful, Joyful”)
Lauryn Hill, and the cast of the 1993 film “Sister Act 2” performing a Gospel version of “Ode to Joy” theme (“Joyful, Joyful”).
The late-great Leonard Bernstein conducting Beethoven’s 9th Symphony during an historic performance marking the fall of the Berlin Wall, performed on Christmas Day 1989.

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